Bruce Springsteen Cancels North Carolina Show in Act of Solidarity with LGBT Citizens

The state's recently passed HB2 law 'attacks the rights of LGBT citizens,' he said.

Bruce Springsteen Cancels North Carolina Show in Solidarity with LGBT Citizens
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Legendary rocker and admirable human being Bruce Springsteen won't be headed to North Carolina any time soon, thanks to a controversial new law.

HB2, or the "bathroom" law, strips the right of transgender individuals to use public restrooms at their discretion, meaning that if they haven't taken surgical and legal action to change their gender (an incredibly costly process) they must use the restroom of their biological gender.

Known as the Public Facilities Privacy and Security Act, HB2 also ostracizes sexual orientation from the list of circumstances protected against discrimination or, in other words, continues to curb a gay person's right to seek legal protection should they be discriminated against in North Carolina.

To be clear, this means there is absolutely no law — state or federal — protecting homosexual NC citizens from discrimination, in the work place or otherwise.

Bruce Springsteen Cancels North Carolina Show in Solidarity with LGBT Citizens
Getty

On Friday, Springsteen issued a statement explaining HB2, and why he could no longer bring himself to support the state:

In full, the message reads:

"As you, my fans, know I’m scheduled to play in Greensboro, North Carolina this Sunday. As we also know, North Carolina has just passed HB2, which the media are referring to as the 'bathroom' law.

Some things are more important than a rock show and this fight against prejudice and bigotry — which is happening as I write — is one of them.

"HB2 — known officially as the Public Facilities Privacy and Security Act — dictates which bathrooms transgender people are permitted to use. Just as important, the law also attacks the rights of LGBT citizens to sue when their human rights are violated in the workplace. No other group of North Carolinians faces such a burden. To my mind, it’s an attempt by people who cannot stand the progress our country has made in recognizing the human rights of all of our citizens to overturn that progress. Right now, there are many groups, businesses, and individuals in North Carolina working to oppose and overcome these negative developments. Taking all of this into account, I feel that this is a time for me and the band to show solidarity for those freedom fighters.

"As a result, and with deepest apologies to our dedicated fans in Greensboro, we have canceled our show scheduled for Sunday, April 10th. Some things are more important than a rock show and this fight against prejudice and bigotry — which is happening as I write — is one of them. It is the strongest means I have for raising my voice in opposition to those who continue to push us backwards instead of forwards."

Nearly 200,000 people had liked the post at the time of this article's publishing, in addition to democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton.

Springsteen's move follows statements from Disney and Viacom, who have committed to ceasing film work in Georgia should a similar law pass there.

The 66-year-old is well known for his past humanitarian efforts, working to eradicate homelessness and hungriness in the world. In 2013, he received the Recording Academy’s MusiCares Person of the Year award for his efforts.

Find me on Twitter @WellHelloCecily. Instagram @CecilyTrowbridge.
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