'Big Bang Theory's Melissa Rauch Announces Pregnancy, Reveals Past Miscarriage

In the midst of the good news, Rauch is opening up about 'one of the most profound sorrows' she has ever experienced.

'Big Bang Theory's Melissa Rauch Announces Pregnancy, Reveals Past Miscarriage
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In a new essay penned for Glamour, The Big Bang Theory's Melissa Rauch both announced her pregnancy and revealed her past miscarriage. Undoubtedly, the star (otherwise known as Bernadette) opened herself up in a profound way, exhibiting a level of bravery most will never rival. Her goal, it seems, is to ensure other women experiencing infertility struggles do not feel alone.

While Rauch is now expecting her first child with husband Winston, she said simply announcing the happy news would feel fraudulent. Instead, she chose to offer the good along with the bad.

"Here is the only statement regarding my pregnancy that doesn’t make me feel like a complete fraud," she wrote. "Melissa is expecting her first child. She is extremely overjoyed, but if she's being honest, due to the fact that she had a miscarriage the last time she was pregnant, she's pretty much terrified at the moment that it will happen again. She feels weird even announcing this at all, and would rather wait until her child heads off to college to tell anyone, but she figures she should probably share this news before someone sees her waddling around with her mid-section protruding and announces it first."

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When Rauch experienced her miscarriage, she said, she felt alienated. Now, in order to help other women, she has shared her own journey, recalling how she felt when she'd see other women announce their pregnancies as she was struggling: "It's not that I wasn’t happy for these people," she wrote, "but I would think, 'Why are these shiny, carefree, fertile women so easily able to do what I cannot?"

"So when I thought about having to share the news about expecting this baby," she continued, "all I could think about was another woman mourning over her loss as I did, worried she would never get pregnant again, and reading about my little bundle on the way. It felt a bit disingenuous to not also share the struggle it took for me to get here."

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Rauch went on to call her miscarriage "one of the most profound sorrows I have ever felt in my life," and remind women not to blame themselves for something they can't control:

"'Miscarriage' by the way, deserves to be ranked as one of the worst, most blame-inducing medical terms ever," she expressed. "To me, it immediately conjures up an implication that it was the woman’s fault, like she somehow “mishandled the carrying of this baby.” F that so hard, right in its patriarchal nut-sack."

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She concluded the essay with an emotional appeal:

"So, to all the women out there who are dealing with fertility issues, have gone through a miscarriage or are going through the pain of it currently," she wrote, "allow me to leave you with this message: You are not alone. And, it is perfectly OK to not be OK right now."

Read the full essay at Glamour.

Find me on Twitter @WellHelloCecily. Instagram @CecilyTrowbridge.
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