Rajon Rondo -- Blatant foul by Celtic draws criticism

Rajob Rondo is drawing criticism for a blantant foul against the Chicago Bulls' Brad Miller.
A blatant foul by the Boston Celtics' Rajon Rondo is drawing criticism from some in the NBA, but the point guard will not be suspended.

At the end of regulation of the Celtics-Bulls playoff game on Tuesday, Rondo hit the Bulls' Brad Miller in the face as Miller went up for a lay-off, sending the shot wide. The Celtics ended up winning the game, heading into Game 6 of the playoffs leading 3-2.

From an AP report:
The NBA said Boston Celtics point guard Rajon Rondo won't be penalized for his hard foul on Chicago's Brad Miller in the closing seconds of Game 5.

League spokesman Tim Frank said Wednesday that the play "stands as called." That means no fine or suspension for Rondo or even flagrant foul points that could lead to a suspension if they accumulate.

With the Bulls trailing by two in the final seconds of overtime on Tuesday night, Miller had a clear path to the basket. But Rondo jumped and hit him across the face and the lay-in attempt sailed wide.

Though Rondo made contact with Miller above the shoulders, NBA executive vice president of basketball operations Stu Jackson said the play fell short of warranting a flagrant foul.

"We felt Rondo was making a basketball play and going for the ball after a blown defensive assignment by the Celtic team," Jackson said.

"In terms of the criteria that we use to evaluate a flagrant foul penalty one, generally we like to consider whether or not there was a windup, an appropriate level of impact and a follow-through. And with this foul, we didn't see a windup, nor did he follow through. So for that reason we're not going to upgrade this foul to a flagrant foul penalty one."

Miller missed the free throws that could have tied it, and the Celtics won 106-104 to take a 3-2 lead in the best-of-seven series.

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A senior associate editor at Zimbio, writing about entertainment and current events.
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