Rose McGowan Defends Renee Zellweger After Writer Pens Article Criticizing Her Face

The piece was titled, 'Renee Zellweger: If She No Longer Looks Like Herself Has She Become a Different Actress?'

Rose McGowan Defends Renee Zellweger After Writer Pens Piece Criticizing Her Face
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Rose McGowan is no stranger to controversy. She doesn't shy away from an opportunity to lay ruin to a Hollywood injustice, and since retiring from acting, the former Charmed star's favorite pastime seems to be calling them out one by one. It's no surprise, then, that her freshest target is Variety film critic Owen Gleiberman and his recently penned piece on — wait for it: Renee Zellweger's Bridget Jones's Baby performance...overall talent...career accomplishments. Nope: face.

In Gleiberman's new piece, legitimately (and bafflingly) titled, "Renee Zellweger: If She No Longer Looks Like Herself Has She Become a Different Actress?" the writer tackles the age-old plastic surgery question, "Did she or didn't she?" Once that's addressed (yes, she most definitely did), he goes on to write nine sizable paragraphs on whether or not he can still enjoy her newest film if she no longer looks like the "slightly slovenly doughy-cuddly" person that she did before.

Rose McGowan Defends Renee Zellweger After Writer Pens Article Criticizing Her Face
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There are many ways to interpret Gleiberman's words, and in all fairness, he does point out that, "Today, more than ever, movie stars look like models, and there’s a pressure on them to conform to certain 'standards.'" But it's there that the piece strays from the thoughtful essay it could have (should have, would have) been into a full-on assault of Zellweger's judgment and confidence:

"The amount of cosmetic surgery that goes on in Hollywood would shock almost anyone who learned about it, because the truth is that a great many stars who don’t look nipped and tucked, and who publicly decry plastic surgery, have had the work done," Gleiberman writes. "But that, by definition, is to keep them looking younger, to keep them looking like 'themselves.' (That’s why you can’t tell.) The syndrome we’re talking about is far more insidious, because when you see someone who no longer looks like who they are, it’s not necessarily the result of bad cosmetic surgery. It’s the result of a decision, an ideology, a rejection of the self."

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Enter McGowan, who wrote a response to Gleiberman published to The Hollywood Reporter on Wednesday. Just as many readers perceived his piece as a direct attack on Zellweger, McGowan speaks directly to the writer in her own article:

"You are an active endorser of what is tantamount to harassment and abuse of actresses and women," she writes, later suggesting that he take note of her own interests, which "are bigger than pondering a stranger’s face."

"You are simply a bully on semiglossy paper," she concludes.

McGowan's former Charmed co-star Alyssa Milano also responded to the piece via Twitter.

In response, Gleiberman retweeted this individual's sentiment about "being so PC":

He has declined to comment further.

To read McGowan's full response, head to The Hollywood Reporter.

Find me on Twitter @WellHelloCecily. Instagram @CecilyTrowbridge.
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